New Rum Sipping Culture

Samadhi Pizzorni, a Marketing Supervisor with the Bacardi distribution company in Panama recently visited Aruba and hosted a fun premium Rum Tasting event at Azia Restaurant & Lounge.

She introduced 4 new varieties which similar to fine Whiskeys have been blended and aged in oak barrels.

While the Whiskey production industry falls under strict regulations and rules, because of lack of such legal structure Bacardi is working on its own guidelines, maturing its rum more than ever to create a new rum sipping culture.

The tasting at Azia Restaurant & Lounge introduced the new brands to an enthusiastic local audience. Tropical Bottling is the local distributor for the fine Bacardi products.

Bacardi Anejo Cuarto

It takes four years maturing in a barrel under the Caribbean sun to create the unique taste of BACARDÍ Añejo Cuatro.

Bacardi reserve Ocho

Created in 1862, BACARDÍ Reserva Ocho is one of the oldest private rum blends in the world. For seven generations, the BACARDÍ family enjoyed it as their personal reserve. Today this golden sipping rum is available everywhere.

BACARDÍ RESERVA DIEZ

Expertly blended. Barrel-aged for a minimum of ten years then filtered through charcoal for a smooth finish. BACARDÍ Gran Reserva Diez is a dark gold rum.

BACARDÍ GRAN RESERVA LIMITADA

A blend of mature Puerto Rican rums, BACARDÍ Gran Reserva Limitada is aged in barrels for 12 years. Appealing to the most discerning palette, each golden glass delivers a medley of warm flavors.

Bacardi the largest privately held, family-owned spirits company in the world. Originally known for its eponymous Bacardi white rum, it now has a portfolio of more than 200 brands and labels. Founded in 1862, and family-owned for seven generations, Bacardi employs 6,000 people, manufactures at 29 facilities in 16 markets on four continents, with sales in more than 150 countries. The company sells in excess of 200 million bottles per year.

Whether it’s called rum (English), rhum (French) or ron (Spanish), this eau de vie made from sugar cane remains the common denominator between the Caribbean islands and the South American countries, with each boasting its own distinctive culture and set of traditions.

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November 06, 2018
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