Censo: An enormous and much-needed undertaking

I checked the United States Census Bureau and found out there are 329,253, 533 persons living in the US but because there is 1 birth every 9 seconds and one death every 11 seconds, plus one international migrant every 44 seconds, the net gain is one person every 24 seconds, so chances are we now have 329,253, 541 people living in the US.

How do they know?

They conduct a survey. Meticulously collecting information that would allow decision-makers to reach informed-decisions about how many garbage trucks to buy and how many schools to open, in the next 10 years.

World population by the way, was 7,628,482,612 when I started writing this column, and is 7,628, 483,845, as I reached the second paragraph. That’s 1,233 additional mouths. We must plan to house, feed and educate them.

The CBS website also offers similar information, and the fifth 2010 Population and Housing Censo of September 29th is available for download with incredibly detailed data on every aspect of our life on the island including projections, looking into the future to predict what it will be like.

In their words: Development is about improving the lives of people. Policy and fiscal decisions should rely on data which tells us who these people are, where and how they live, and how their lives are changing. The demographic and related data that answers these questions are essential to policy-makers and development-planners across nearly every sector of our society. The fundamental purpose of the population and housing census is to provide actual, accurate and complete facts for planning and policy-making purposes. The census is unique because it is the only source of detailed socio-economic, demographic data at small geographic areas including neighborhoods and communities. It is the only body of comprehensive sub-provincial statistical data on population, housing and hard-to reach/special population groups such as seniors, persons with disabilities and migrants.

I checked with CBS if there will be a possibility to participate in the Censo online or on the phone, similar to the US.

They answered immediately: The difference between the US Census and the Aruba Census is that in the US, the Census questionnaire contains 9 questions per person. In the Aruba Census questionnaire we have more than 9 questions.

During the Census, we will be filling a digital questionnaire on an Android tablet. The questionnaire will be filled by enumerators that will visit each and every living-quarter on Aruba. The questionnaire can only be completed by Census enumerators. It will not be made available online, given the magnitude and complexity of the questions. Enumerators are being trained on the definitions and procedures used in the survey, right now.

We thank you for the interest you have shown in the Census. We aim to inform the public about the questions that will be asked and reiterate why it is important to participate. Each and every question asked was subjected to a thorough review-process to make sure it is needed/essential in providing policy-makers, academia, and the public in general with relevant information about the socio-demographic characteristics of the population of Aruba. Our motto is: Better data, better policies, better lives, better Aruba. Best regards, Desiree Helde, Deputy Director, Central Bureau of Statistics

Share on:

February 05, 2020
Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster
Bati Bleki by Rona Coster